Part 3 of 4 of Intuitive Sales: Checking-in with Your Inner Radar

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The theme of this month’s blog posts are focused on intuitive sales; and more specifically, learning to let your intuition guide you in sales for more impactful results.   

Now that we have covered the first key steps of getting in-touch with your intuition for greater results in sales in terms of slowing down and then asking open-ended questions, the next step involved checking-in with your own inner radar.

You inner radar is informed from your full bodily intelligence, which is where at least 75% of communication is happening all the time. That means your gut, your heart, your solar plexus, and the neuroreceptors throughout your whole body. 

The fact is that we are picking up on information around us, but we are not aware of most of it as this would be overwhelming.

When we slow down and start to pay attention to what’s happening in the moment within a sales conversation, we are developing our inner radar which helps us detect what’s happening nonverbally in the relational space between us and the buyer. And this is where all the critical signals and cues are happening.

The key is to start tracking what you are feeling in your body when you are engaging with a prospect, and then using this information to engage more intuitively with the person in front of you.

Your Tracker

What do you notice? What are the inner indicators and signals telling you? What do you choose to share from here or simply make note of? 

Do you get a sense that they need more information about the topic? That they are hesitant for some reason? Or that they have a question that’s bubbling to the surface that needs to be answered? Perhaps there is something off-putting that you want to check-out and ask a question around?

Learning to listen to and trust your own inner radar with all of the signals and cues you pick up on will over time, become a reliable resource of information on how to direct the sales conversation. 

The more you practice listening and discerning what your own system is telling you, the more you can build relationship and use this as a guide on what to ask next. 

Intuition is just about feeling into what the moment needs. Ask yourself what does the space need? What does the person I’m with need? You don’t even need to know what it is. You just need to know that you are feeling something. And then you give yourself permission to say it. 

Practice tuning into what you feel in your next conversations this week. How can you use this data to build connection and deepen results if you are applying this to sales?

Stay tuned for the final part of our series next week on intuitive sales and in the meantime, check-out our FB Live for a more in-depth conversation. For more information on how to train and develop your intuitive skills to improve your sales results, contact us at [email protected].

Part 2 of 4 of Intuitive Sales: Asking Open Ended Questions

  Image via: Hubspot

Image via: Hubspot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The theme of this month’s blog posts are focused on intuitive sales; and more specifically, learning to let your intuition guide you in sales for more impactful results.   

Once you’ve slowed yourself down in the sales conversation and gotten present with the person in front of you, you also get more present to their needs and desires. This is the key to sales and in building relationship. You have also avoided the biggest mistake that most salespeople make: they keep the attention on themselves and what they are selling and forget to put their attention on the buyer. 

All too often, the salesperson stays in their comfort zone of what they know about their product or service, and are afraid to get more relational with the buyer. 

When you are in a sales conversation—instead of leading with all of the details of your product or the five tips you just learned from your latest sales training—start by asking open ended questions that help you really get a feel for what they are wanting with your product/service and how they intend to use it. 

The more you get them talking about themselves and what their passions are, or what discomfort they are wanting to avoid, you arrive at what really matters to them. Open-ended questions are the opposite of yes/no questions which are conversation-killers. 

Examples

For example, if you are selling blenders, you might ask: “What are you intending to use this blender for?” You will open up the opportunity to join with them on their passions such as cooking or juicing, or even something functional that they just need to make their life easier. 

If you are selling website services, you might ask: “Why are you looking for a new website right now?” This question will give you insight into their intentions, vision, and what they want for their business. 

Whatever you are selling, asking open-ended questions helps you understand how they intend to use your product or service, and gets them excited about what they need or want.

If you are not getting enough information, use your intuition on what to ask next, and trust your inner guidance until you feel a connection with what the person in front of you wants.

Practice asking open-ended questions this week with prospective buyers and see what happens when you engage them with curiosity, openness, and deep listening. Chances are they haven’t had an experience of someone being this present with them in a long time.

Stay tuned for the rest of our series on intuitive sales and in the meantime, check-out our FB Live for a more in-depth conversation. For more information on how to train and develop your intuitive skills to improve your sales results, contact us at [email protected] 

Part 1 of 4 of Intuitive Sales: Slowing Down

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The theme of this month’s blog posts are focused on intuitive sales; and more specifically, learning to let your intuition guide you in sales for more impactful results.   

Whether you sell consulting services, software, health and wellness, construction, or any product, intuition is the great differentiator in business. Listening to and trusting your intuition in the sales process separates you from the pack as most people are not listening to theirs. It’s in listening to your intuition that you build more trust, connection, and a win-win result. Yet developing intuitive skills for sales is rarely talked about in training, ongoing education, and mentoring. 

And for those of you who are averse to sales, it’s time to make peace with the fact that we all sell. Persuasion and sales are a fundamental part of life. Whether it’s a product or service, or a point of view in politics or religion, we are all selling or promoting what we value. 

The Missing Ingredient

We have more robust CRM platforms than ever before with better sales metrics and tracking, yet what’s not emphasized enough is the key ingredient in sales that will never change: the relationship.

There is no replacement for learning to listen to our intuitive nature and sensing what is happening in the space between ourselves and the prospect. This awareness puts us in a closer relationship with ourselves and the person in front of us, as we begin to tune into the signals and cues in our environment. The key to tapping into our intuition is slowing down.

Slowing Down

So often, salespeople get caught up in getting the buyer to cross the finish line or “the close.” The problem with this is that you are no longer in the present moment with them as you are off into the future. Yet in the present moment is where all the data you need to know is occurring. This is where the sale happens.

For example, when you slow down, breathe, and take a pause from your script or what you think you should say next, what are you noticing with the person in front of you? Are they hesitating? Do you pick up something in their body language? Are they excited and present with you? Are their eyes glazed over?

And what do you notice in your own experience? Are you bored? Are you feeling engaged and curious? Is your attention all on yourself and the facts about your product, or are you really focusing on them and what they are wanting and needing? Did you even take a moment to truly ask them this question? 

Deepening Connection
 
Teach your salespeople to slow down during the sales conversation. When you slow down and get really present with the person in front of you, their whole story and their whole world open up for you. When you put full attention on what they are saying, what they are not saying, and how they are saying it, you open up your awareness to not just the content, but the context of where they are coming from. 

This is where you join them in what they truly want and need. This is where the sales happens. 

When we slow down, our intuition finds us. We are able to take in more information and access our subconscious, which is where intuition lives. From here, we might even be surprised at the level of detail that we start to notice in the quality of the conversation, or something about the person in front of us, that has us want to learn more. 

And when a buyer feels like you actually are listening and that you actually care, relationship builds. 

Practice listening to your intuition and instinct on what needs to be added to or excluded from the conversation, in order to build a better connection with the person in front of you. When you can slow down and become more aware of their reactions and responses as well as your own, you are on your way to more authentic and powerful relating, which is the key to sales. 

Stay tuned for the rest of our series on intuitive sales and in the meantime, check-out our FB Live for a more in-depth conversation. For more information on how to train and develop your intuitive skills to improve your sales results, contact us at [email protected] 

Stay tuned for the rest of our series on intuitive sales and in the meantime, check-out our FB Live for a more in-depth conversation. For more information on how to train and develop your intuitive skills to improve your sales results, contact us at [email protected]

Part 4 of 4 of Embracing My Failures: Fail Fast

 Image via: CMG Partners

Image via: CMG Partners

The theme of this month’s blog posts are centered around embracing my failures in running a business. The number one ingredient to changing my perspective around seeing failures as learning opportunities, was getting mentors in my life who’d been there, done that, and helped me see a new way of approaching challenges. 

Fail Fast

A leading tech company's mantra is: Fail Fast. This speaks to the heart of entrepreneurialism. If you are not making mistakes, coming up short or overshooting targets, then you are playing it safe and not innovating. 

Failing is a part of learning and it’s how we grow. The aforementioned motto is powerful because it inspires risk-taking, action, and getting involved versus sitting on the sidelines with a bad case of analysis paralysis. Failing fast encourages your team to think outside-the-box and look for ways to disrupt the status quo. Embracing real innovation means that your company culture knows that making mistakes are part of the human journey and how we evolve. 

Get a Mentor

I have grown the fastest and learned the most from my failings with the help of mentors and coaches. As the adage goes, “We can’t see our own eye.” There are things all of us can’t see about ourselves and we literally need the help of others to get around the corners of our own awareness limitations. 

When someone is able to reflect something to me that’s outside my radar, I win. They are contributing to me if they are confirming a truth that I needed to hear again, or if it’s something that I had no idea about. Having these trusted people in your lives that you can go to as a sounding board, helps you become a better leader, family member and friend.

Re-frame Failure as an Opportunity to Grow

Instead of seeing failure as a...failure, how can we shift our perspective and see it as an opportunity to learn and grow? Growth happens at the intersection of challenge and support. And when we have the right mixture of the two, and bring a more supportive attitude toward our biggest challenges, we have the fuel to overcome them. 

Thanks for tuning into our series around embracing failures. Check-out our FB live videos for a more in-depth conversation on these very topics from this past month HERE. For more information on how to turn your biggest breakdowns into breakthroughs, contact us at [email protected] 

Part 3 of 4 of Embracing My Failures: The Challenge of Holdings Others Accountable

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The theme of this month’s blog posts are centered around embracing my failures in running a business. This is something we don’t talk enough about openly, and my hope is that in sharing some of my own failures, it will help you have more room to acknowledge and share your own, so that we can all continue to learn and grow from each other’s experiences.

You get what you tolerate.

One of my flawed patterns that’s been difficult to overcome is holding others accountable. When I coach other business owners or managers, this isn’t so challenging for me as they are often paying to have someone hold them accountable and that’s part of our agreement. 

But when it’s been in my own company or with those closer to me, I can tend to hold back and not hold clear boundaries around agreements, expectations, and consequences if someone doesn’t follow through. 

Underneath it all is a fear of being seen as the “bad guy,” or not being understanding to people’s excuses or reasons why they did or did not follow through on something. 

I once had a dear friend of mine stop me on the street after he sensed that I was hesitating in giving him more direct feedback, and he said, “Rick, you’re a good guy. But your ‘good guy’ is getting in the way of being a great man.”

I knew exactly what he meant as my wanting to be “nice, pleasing, and not rocking the boat” was actually not serving him as a friend and colleague, as he wanted and even needed my direct feedback in order to see his own blind spots.

This made a big impact on me as I committed to leaning into my own discomfort and risk not being liked, rejected, or misunderstood for offering direct feedback early on in relationships, and not after the fact. 

Fast-forward to this year, I hired a great assistant who was helping me in several areas of my business. He turned in great work, was very knowledgeable, taught me several things, and started off strong. 

At some point, his work started to slip and he had one personal crisis after another that created a lot of dropped balls, miscommunication, lack of follow-through and broken agreements. 

I had a lot of sympathy at-first, as it seemed like there were genuine issues going on. The problem was that this lack of responsibility continued, and then I was chasing him to follow-up on projects too often. It was becoming more of a burden than a help.

I leaned into my own discomfort and felt the risk of being seen as the bad guy, which is an old story of mine that’s not true. I needed to respect myself and my own standards for my company, by continuing to communicate the impact of not getting the result that was promised. And setting clear boundaries of what needed to change in moving forward.

I said, “I am sorry that you are going through a lot and I am here to support you, but you can’t use this as a currency to get out of work and not be responsive as to when you can recommit to new deadlines.” 

After several warnings and basically having the same conversation again and again, I let this person know that this was no longer working and that I needed to move on. He understood and appreciated that I was honest and upfront with him the whole time.

It was good for both of us as it respected my own values around communication and responsibility, and has now opened the door to two new assistants who are giving me great support for the growth I need. It also woke something up in him that needed to change in his life and how he related to it. 

Having these crucial conversations is critical to a healthy business and life. It’s the only way to bring the most value to others, while respecting your own. What are some of your conversations that have been difficult to lean into? How are you challenging that for yourself?


Stay tuned for the rest of our series as we’ll explore embracing failures. In the meantime, you can view part one of the series via my Facebook. For more information on how to turn your biggest breakdowns into breakthroughs, contact us at [email protected].

Part 2 of 4 of Embracing My Failures: Burn-out

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The theme of this month’s blog posts are centered around embracing my failures in running a business. This is something we don’t talk enough about openly, and my hope is that in sharing some of my own failures, it will help you have more room to acknowledge and share your own, so that we can all continue to learn and grow from each other’s experiences.

Several years ago, I had launched my Three Hats coaching business and was more successful on paper then I had ever been. I was coaching with businesses around the world, and fulfilling one of my dreams in traveling to Guyana, Australia, South Africa, the UK, and throughout the US leading trainings and workshops. I was working harder than I’ve ever worked.

I was driven to build and scale beyond myself, the very things that I had coached others to do. I worked until late hours in the night and was driven to just keep growing and growing. 

What I didn’t realize is that I had fallen into one of my patterns of just doing, but losing connection of WHY I was doing it in the first place. I can get so into a groove and work hard, but lose track of the bigger WHY, and sometimes forget to have fun and enjoy my life. 

And this was noticeable to those around me before I was aware of it. I was spread too thin, trying to fill courses halfway around the world in Australia without much local support or connections, and a mentor who I was working with finally got through to me:

“Hey Rick, you are doing really well, making more sales than you’ve ever made, helping more people than you’ve helped. So why are you not happy?”

It didn’t occur to me that I wasn’t happy, or at least I didn’t want to acknowledge this. And her words hit me right in the chest as I felt the truth of my experience. Having someone outside of me “get my world,” was critical and I could finally give myself permission to feel my unhealthy drive that had gone off-track.

I spent the next few months slowing down, making better choices, and getting more clear as to what I really want to do and WHY. I started saying No to opportunities and got more choosy in who I worked with. I realized that I need to re-evaluate my WHY every so often because the WHY changes, depending on where I am at in my life.

I’ve embraced that one of my flaws is to stay busy and keep going, and when I get in this mode, it’s a good indicator that there is something that I’m not slowing down to feel.

And the busyness doesn’t make the emptiness or unhappiness underneath go away.  

Slowing down is the most important thing I can do to reconnect with myself and the motivation behind my actions. And when I’m connected to what and WHY I’m doing what I’m doing, I am happy and at peace, and that’s worth more to me than whatever achievements I make on paper.

If you can relate or have your own symptoms that tell you when you are off-track, I’d love to hear them! The more we can get aware and talk about these things, the more choice we have in these moments to create a different outcome.

Stay tuned for the rest of our series as we’ll explore embracing failures. In the meantime, you can view part two of the video series via my Facebook. For more information on how to turn your biggest breakdowns into breakthroughs, contact us at [email protected]

Part 1 of 4 of Embracing My Failures: The Fear of Selling

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The theme of this month’s blog posts are centered around embracing my failures in running a business. This is something we don’t talk enough about openly, and my hope is that in sharing some of my own failures, it will help you have more room to acknowledge and share your own, so that we can all continue to learn and grow from each other’s experiences. 

Failure gets a bad rap. So often, I have made it mean that I am permanently flawed and that it’s something I need to hide. Oh - and I’m the only one that does it. Yet from my own experience in running a business and also in life, my failures have taught me more about myself than anything else. I’ve grown over time when I can embrace my failures and see the lessons and support that’s available to me.

I started my first business as a psychotherapist in private practice after having worked with several agencies. I was excited to branch out on my own, create my own brand and to really see if I could make it. I looked presentable, printed out my brochures, and gave a few out, waiting for the phone to start ringing off the hook.

Nothing happened. For months. 

I was discouraged and was easily spending more money than I was making, hoping that people would find out about me because I did good work. 

And I’ll never forget what one of my mentors said to me, “Rick, do you know how conceited it is to think you can just hang up your shingle and expect everyone to come knocking on your door?”

I looked at him with big eyes as I wasn’t feeling conceited. I just had no clue what to do. And as I let his question land in me, I got his point. 

We dug deeper and found that my failure to grow a practice had to do with my fear of selling. I told him that I didn’t want to be salesy and hawk my services. And underneath this, I was just uncomfortable as no one ever showed me how to talk about myself and my services in an effective way.

One of the blind spots of most graduate programs, whether you are a doctor, lawyer, therapist, architect, etc. is that they don’t teach you how to run the business of your occupation. They prepare you for the technical craft, but not how to run a business that does that technical craft. And my experience was the same.  

My mentor gave me a reframe that changed my life. He said, “It’s not about selling yourself. It’s about making yourself visible to the community. And it’s arrogant if you just think you can sit back and expect people to simply knock on your door because you are here.”

This was the message that I needed to hear. I didn’t realize that I had some sort of entitlement going on, which really just covered over my fear of talking about myself, my services, and how I could help people. 

That changed how I thought about sales in-general and I realized I needed to make myself more visible to my target market so that they could at least choose whether to work with me or not. 

Embracing my fears around selling and marketing my services changed everything and soon after, my practice grew and I became profitable for the first time. This lesson still stays with me today as I have learned that sales is about building relationships, and there is no failure in learning how to get better at that each day.

Stay tuned for the rest of our series as we’ll explore embracing failures. In the meantime, you can view part one of the series via my Facebook. For more information on how to turn your biggest breakdowns into breakthroughs, contact us at [email protected].

Intuitive Intelligence Roadblocks — Part Five — Ego

In this month’s series, we are exploring five of the most common roadblocks that get in the way of listening to and acting on your intuition in business. Each week will reveal another common obstacle.

This week is our fifth and final obstacle that we are focusing on: ego. The term ego is used in many different contexts and is defined here simply as your self-image or self-concept. In other words, it’s the story you tell yourself about yourself. We all have an internalized concept of who we are based on a lifetime of conditioning from family, culture, religion, and society—all aspects that form your core identity of self.

Ego in itself is not a bad thing. In fact, it is the organizing principle that helps you function in the world and understand your place in it. Yet your concept of who you are is different than the actual experience of who you are, or how other people experience you.

The problem occurs when you collapse the two and think you are your self-image. What often happens in business or in life is that you are trying to control the narrative of how you are perceived. This is where the ego is working overtime to make sure your self-image is consistent with how you want to be seen.

This can be challenging when you get locked into the idea of what it means to be a leader, manager, or a salesperson. When you are in a position of authority or demonstrating success, then you need to protect and defend this at all costs as any threat to your image can be perceived as self-annihilation. One could argue this is the cause of the majority of conflicts and wars.

Being stuck in a persona of who you think you are or should be is limiting and can feel like an inescapable prison. This type of dynamic harms relationships, as you can’t bring a level of authenticity that’s required for deeper relating.

How Does Ego Get in the Way of Your Intuition?

If you are locked into a concept of who you are and how you should behave, or when you are out just to look good, then you are not free to listen to and act on what you intuitively feel.

You will block out what you sense and feel because this might not align with your social conditioning and programming. Your intuition is not bound by roles, conditions, “shoulds”, obligations, or social norms.

Intuition occurs in the present moment. You get a sudden feeling in the here and now. Even if it’s a premonition about the future. The degree to which you are still reacting from the past about what you find acceptable or of value will directly impact your ability to listen to present day intuition.

Intuition is not about being more comfortable or avoiding the unpleasant. It is about having the courage to say or express what you are feeling from deep within. Intuition threatens our nice little story we have about ourselves. This is great news because we are so much more than we believe we are.

In business as in life, there is a place for the ego and how it helps us organize our reality. The only problem is when we confuse the story we tell about ourselves as absolute truth. Then we need to defend, jostle, get ahead, look good, avoid taking responsibility, and a myriad of behaviors that are only aimed at our self-preservation.

In listening to and acting from our intuitive center, we are able to approach business from a larger perspective that doesn’t just include our own needs, but all stakeholders involved.

For more articles and videos on using your intuition in the workspace, follow us HERE. For information on coaching and training opportunities for building intuitive intelligence on your teams for better decision-making, contact [email protected].